The despair Of The British nation.

Tuesday, 3 April 2012

Espionage And Resistance.

There's Always People To Do The Dirty Work.



Human Nature is something politicians and control freaks always believe they can manipulate, control and change. In many cases they seem to be correct. We see this throughout The EU today. The more the mushroom compost depth grows the less likely anybody is to poke their head out to breathe, it would seem.

In the State's ever demeaning grasp of  our very DNA particles, for their own ends, there is no shortage of willing servants to do their master's bidding. That the Nuremberg  defence seems still to pertain in Government agencies I find very disappointing. Naturally the chain of command muddies the waters with the Civil Service Mandarins' ability to keep their responsibility under wraps.

Never more awful and horrendous an agency and their Global counterparts, in the connivance of evil actions,  is the espionage community. Sure the storm troopers of modern policing,  my Bete Noir and the rest seem easily bought but the picture above shows where this is all headed.

That picture highlights what lengths individuals will go to preserve freedom. I suggest that modern political,  corporate and gangster despots have realised that, though torture and murder of individuals can go undiscovered, if you get a trigger event that sparks a total awareness of the corruption and fear being employed, you get overwhelming resistance.

An event such as the killing of Mark Duggan is a good example of a trigger. Regardless of the efficacy of his killing in a legal or moral sense, it did what the authorities dread most. A collective uprising. Unlike the resistance forces' mobilisation in war time, that cause was localised and a favoured polarised singularity.   

My argument is that if, or rather when, a common and more just anger manifests itself universally, then a movement more likely to succeed is born. Such a growing justifiable defiance does rely on communication. Just as in war in the trenches, in  the air or in the bars and cafes,  mobilisation needs contact and an exchange of plans and strategies. The Internet and its magic of instant electronic exchanges has changed the goal posts. It is, or was, a flatter pitch than in the past. Witness the G20 police nastiness.

So in these last few days and after years of secret meetings, beefing up GCHQ with willing quislings and targeting plain speaking blogger ire, this terrible Government machine, hiding behind their puppet political front men, have created legislative powers to snoop on our blogging, porn site visits and anti-establishment angry exchanges, indeed the whole panoply of our living world.

The lame excuses and trotting out pathetic mantras of "safe streets" and paedophile entrapment doesn't wash. If these treacherous Kapos in our eagerly complicit secret services refused to turn on their fellow citizens we would all be better off. The question often asked, or should be, is how do these evil collaborators sleep at night? It always starts with spying, quickly backed up with censorship. Curfews and supervision can't be far off.

Oh, by the way this subversive attack on our lives is to cost us  £2billion. Now which Government diners will get most of that I wonder! Still, I guess electronic Auschwitz guards will demand expensive gas masks and uniforms. 



4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent post OR
I agree, its not terrorists tptb are afraid of , its us.

ArtCo

Oldrightie said...

ArtCO, many thanks indeed. Hope the beautiful picture is still getting good hits, deservedly.

Dan said...

The uprising and riots which followed the killing of Mark Duggan was not in any way a popular uprising. Duggan was a mid-level player in the drugs market; not a Mr Big but the one bloke in the gang he headed who knew the people next step up the chain; he was responsible for supplying his gang with drugs to sell.

When he died, his gang went from being quite important drugs traders to being a bunch of feckless twerps who didn't know anybody and who could not easily get going again; they lost all their status in one quick moment. They rioted because they were angry with the police for killing off their boss-man and the linchpin of their success.

The rest of the riots were acquisitive in nature. In Manchester on the nights of the rioting, the city was swarming with kids on cheap mountainbikes, all of whom had heard something was going to happen and all of whom fancied a go at nicking something in the mayhem. They were not rising up in socio-political anger at a hateful world; they were just scallies out to nick what they could get. Constructing a corral of fencing and rounding up all these berks inside it for the night would have greatly diminished the effects of the riots.

Finally, if you don't believe me, look at the criminal records of those caught rioting. They all had long, long records for petty crime; these weren't Joe Public raging against an impersonal machine but criminal scum out on the rob.

Oldrightie said...

Dan, are not your comments a different form of this précis?

"An event such as the killing of Mark Duggan is a good example of a trigger. Regardless of the efficacy of his killing in a legal or moral sense, it did what the authorities dread most. A collective uprising. Unlike the resistance forces' mobilisation in war time, that cause was localised and a favoured polarised singularity."

It was collective, there was a trigger, it was polarised, as you point out. The singularity was the criminal aspect of that reaction. I used it as an example of a triggered response to an event.

A response brought about by our successive Governments' love of gerrymandering through mass immigration and the inevitable, proportional rise in criminality. Another trigger waiting to be pulled.